Homelessness

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Homeless households in priority need, households living in temporary accommodation, plus rough sleepers, 2014/15 and recent changes

Services for the homeless

Anyone requiring information on services for the homeless should visit the Homeless UK website that provides details on the range of help available for the homeless and those at risk of homelessness.  Information can also be found on the GOV.UK and Shelter websites.

Summary

Homeless households in priority need

The number of homeless households in priority need within England has increased by 14,230 (35.4%), from the recent low point of 40,200 households in 2009/10, to 54,430 households for 2014/15. By contrast, since 2011/12, numbers have fallen within the Lancashire 14-authority sub-region by 215 households (-45.4%) to 344 households, which is the lowest level since 2005/06. 

In 2014/15, all of the 14 local authorities within the broader Lancashire sub-region had relatively low numbers of households accepted as homeless and in priority need (per 1,000 households) and were placed in the lowest 40% of the rankings. Eight of these were ranked in the lowest 34 positions (of the 326 local authorities within England). Lancaster with 1.24 households (per 1,000 households) had the highest ratio of households accepted as homeless and in priority need within the Lancashire sub-region, followed by South Ribble (0.83 households per 1,000) and Preston (0.82 households per 1,000). In terms of actual numbers, Lancaster recorded the largest figure with 73, followed by 49 households in Blackpool, 48 in Preston, 39 in South Ribble and 36 in Blackburn with Darwen. Hyndburn and Waverly (Surrey), which recorded no homeless households in priority need had the lowest figures within England. Numbers were also at their lowest since 2005/06 in Burnley, Chorley, Hyndburn, Lancaster, Pendle and West Lancashire. There has been some increase in Blackburn with Darwen since 2010/11 and in Blackpool from 2012/13. 

The two London Boroughs of Barking and Dagenham (10.35) and Waltham Forest (10.32), had the highest ratios of households accepted as homeless and in priority need per 1,000 households in England in 2014/15, although Birmingham had the greatest overall number of households at 3,140, followed by Waltham Forest with 1,051 households.

Households living in temporary accommodation and recent changes

A strong pattern of decline in the number of households living in temporary accommodation in England was evident between 2005/06 and 2010/11, but the last few years have seen a reversal in this trend. Over the four years between 2010/11 and 2014/15 the number of households living in temporary accommodation within England had increased by 16,470 households (34.1%), or by more than a third, from the low point of 48,240 recorded in 2010/11 to 64,710 households in 2014/15.

For the Lancashire 14-authority sub-region, numbers have fluctuated since the recent low point of 102 households living in temporary accommodation recorded in 2009/10.  Since 2009/10, numbers peaked at 160 households in 2011/12, but were lower in 2014/15, standing at 133 households.  A similar trend is apparent for the Lancashire County Council 12-authority area.

In 2014/15, 11 of the 14 local authorities within the broader Lancashire sub-region had relatively low numbers of households living in temporary accommodation and were placed in the lowest 37% of the rankings. Blackpool, placed in 154th position, was the only Lancashire authority to fall in the top half of the rankings. Blackpool, South Ribble and Preston have consistently recorded relatively greater figures in comparison to the other Lancashire authorities, having 35, 28 and 19 households living in temporary accommodation in 2014/15, respectively.  Hyndburn, Ribble Valley, Rossendale, West Lancashire and Wyre recorded fewer than five households living in temporary accommodation in 2014/15 and have generally had low numbers over the past ten years. These districts fall in the lowest 6% of the rankings.

The three London Boroughs of Newham, Brent and Haringey, recorded the greatest numbers of households living in temporary accommodation in 2014/15, recording totals of 3,302, 3,161 and 2,997 households, respectively.

Rough Sleepers

For autumn 2014, the 14 Lancashire authorities provided either street counts or estimates that together came to 37 rough sleepers in the sub-region. For England as a whole, the figure was 2,744.  These statistics are published in February of each year and refer to the number of rough sleepers in the previous autumn taken via a snapshot on a single night.

 

Introduction

This short article contains information on the number of households accepted as homeless and in priority need in Lancashire between April 2014 and March 2015 and the change in numbers since 2005/06.  The figures have been downloaded from the Department of Communities and Local Government website.  The site has a 'live tables on homelessness'  page that gives access to the homelessness figures including those that are published each year down to the local authority area level. The figures in this article are sourced from Table 784.  Although not analysed here, the source table includes additional data relating to those households that are eligible, homeless but not in priority need; those households that are eligible, homeless and in priority need, but intentionally; those households that are eligible, but not homeless; total decisions; and the number of households where a duty is owed by the authority but no accommodation has been secured at end of each financial year (2008/09 to 2014/15).   

This report is also contains data on the number of households living in temporary accommodation that are available from the same data source.

This article also highlights the rough sleepers figures that are available for Lancashire local authorities. 

The information is used in the development of housing needs indices, responses to parliamentary questions and for policy development on housing issues. Local authorities also use the data for either management purposes or to assist the continued development of housing strategies.

Households accepted as homeless and in priority need

Within England, the local authority with the largest number of households accepted as homeless and in priority need for the year to March 2015 was Birmingham with 3,140 households. This figure was well in excess of that recorded for Waltham Forest in second place with 1,051 households, and Ealing in third position with 926 households.

Table 1 reveals that in the 14-authority Lancashire sub-region in 2014/15, there were 344 households accepted as homeless and in priority need, which equates to just 0.6% of the England total of 54,430.  Lancaster recorded the largest number with 73, followed by 49 households in Blackpool, 48 in Preston, 39 in South Ribble and 36 in Blackburn with Darwen. Hyndburn was one of only two authorities in England that returned a zero figure, whilst Chorley was one of 5 authorities across the country with less than 5 households accepted as homeless and in priority need (values of less than 5 are suppressed). In the Lancashire County Council 12-authority area, 259 households were accepted as homeless and in priority need, or just 0.6% of the England total.

Looking at the number of households accepted as homeless and in priority need per 1,000 households in each area, all of the 14 local authorities within the broader Lancashire sub-region had low figures and were placed in the lowest 40% of the rankings, and eight of these (including Chorley) were ranked in the lowest 34 positions (roughly the 10% with the lowest numbers).  Within the broader Lancashire sub-region, Lancaster with 1.24 households (per 1,000 households) had the highest ratio of households accepted as homeless and in priority need, followed by South Ribble (0.83 households) and Preston (0.82 households).  Within England, the highest numbers were recorded within the two London Boroughs of Barking and Dagenham (10.35 households per 1,000) and Waltham Forest (10.32 households per 1,000).  Hyndburn and Waverly (Surrey), which recorded no homeless households in priority need (0), had the lowest figures within England in 2014/15.

The Department for Communities and Local Government website details some of the initiatives that are in place to reduce levels of homelessness.

Table 1: Households accepted as homeless and in priority need, April 2014 to March 2015

Area

Households accepted as homeless & in priority need (1)

Number per 1,000 households (1)

Rank of 326 authorities in England (by per 1,000 households) (1)

Lancaster

73

1.24

193

South Ribble

39

0.83

234

Preston

48

0.82

236

Burnley

29

0.77

246

Blackpool UA

49

0.76

248

Blackburn with Darwen UA

36

0.62

273

West Lancashire

21

0.46

288

Rossendale

13

0.44

291

Ribble Valley

9

0.36

300

Fylde

11

0.31

304

Pendle

9

0.24

308

Wyre

7

0.15

315

Chorley

-

-

-

Hyndburn

0

0.00

320

Lancashire 14-authority sub-region

344

-

-

Lancashire 12-authority area

259

-

-

England

54,430

2.4

-

Notes: (-) values less than 5 are suppressed, which was the case for Chorley. No percentage rates were therefore available for 5 of the 326 local authorities in England. Hyndburn was one of only two authorities to actually record a zero figure in the 2014/15 year.

Source: Department of Communities and Local Government (Table 784).

Change in the number of households accepted as homeless and in priority need

Tables 2a and 2b show that the number of homeless households in priority need within England has increased by +14,230 (35.4%), from the recent low point of 40,200 households recorded for 2009/10, to 54,430 households for 2014/15.

By contrast, since 2011/12, the most recent high point, the number of households accepted as homeless and in priority need have reduced within the Lancashire 14-authority sub-region and the Lancashire County Council 12-authority area and now stand at their lowest levels since 2005/06.  Numbers have fallen by 215 households (-45.4%) within the Lancashire 14-authority sub-region from 531 households to 344 households between 2011/12 and 2014/15 and decreased by 187 households (-35.2%) in the Lancashire County Council 12-authority area, from 474 households to 259 households over the last three years. 

In 2014/15, the number of households accepted as homeless and in priority need are also at their lowest levels since 2005/06 in Burnley, Chorley, Hyndburn, Lancaster, Pendle and West Lancashire.  Numbers in Preston, Ribble Valley, South Ribble, Rossendale, Wyre and the Fylde district are also generally much lower in 2014/15 than they were at the start of the series in 2005/06, but they appear to have plateaued some years ago and varied only slightly in more recent years. There has been some evidence of increase in Blackburn with Darwen since 2010/11 and Blackpool from 2012/13.

Table 2a: Households accepted as homeless and in priority need, 2010/11 to 2014/15

Area  

2010/11

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

Burnley

4

84

61

38

29

Chorley

6

37

22

0

-

Fylde

8

11

9

13

11

Hyndburn

2

6

8

-

0

Lancaster

114

90

66

90

73

Pendle

34

33

22

18

9

Preston

47

55

54

46

48

Ribble Valley

13

12

16

7

9

Rossendale

26

22

15

9

13

South Ribble

46

44

43

52

39

West Lancashire

54

70

68

35

21

Wyre

7

10

10

9

7

Lancashire 12-authority area

405

474

394

317

259

Blackburn with Darwen UA

19

27

24

40

36

Blackpool UA

59

30

30

37

49

Lancashire 14-authority sub-region

483

531

448

394

259

England

44,160

50,290

53,770

52,290

54,430

Notes: (-) values less than 5 are suppressed. (..) no data supplied.

Source: Department of Communities and Local Government (Table 784).

Table 2b: Households accepted as homeless and in priority need, 2005/06 to 2009/10

Area  

2005/06

2006/07

2007/08

2008/09

2009/10

Burnley

90

47

63

75

45

Chorley

190

..

173

80

34

Fylde

..

21

11

9

12

Hyndburn

65

17

8

5

6

Lancaster

316

241

181

94

130

Pendle

62

25

31

18

21

Preston

155

136

144

108

46

Ribble Valley

38

20

14

13

5

Rossendale

109

45

44

52

30

South Ribble

215

151

93

55

35

West Lancashire

112

121

94

61

56

Wyre

80

..

34

4

6

Lancashire 12-authority area

1,432

824

890

574

426

Blackburn with Darwen UA

190

118

137

47

41

Blackpool UA

232

102

89

65

51

Lancashire 14-authority sub-region

1,854

1,044

1,116

686

518

England

93,980

73,360

63,170

53,430

40,020

Notes: (-) values less than 5 are suppressed. (..) no data supplied.

Source: Department of Communities and Local Government (Table 784).

Households living in temporary accommodation and recent changes

Tables 3a and 3b reveal a strong pattern of decline in the number of households classified as living in temporary accommodation in England between 2005/06 and 2010/11, but the last few years have seen a reversal in this trend. As at 2014/15, the number for the whole of England increased by +16,470 households (34.1%) to 64,710, more than a third higher than the low point of 48,240 recorded in 2010/11.

For the Lancashire 14-authority sub-region, numbers have fluctuated since the recent low point of 102 households living in temporary accommodation recorded in 2009/10.  Since 2009/10, numbers peaked at 160 households in 2011/12, but were lower in 2014/15, standing at 133 households.  A similar situation is apparent for the Lancashire County Council 12-authority area. Here, numbers have fluctuated since the recent low point of 78 households living in temporary accommodation recorded in 2009/10, peaking at 132 for 2011/12, but were lower again in 2014/15, at 93 households.     

In 2014/15, 11 of the 14 local authorities within the broader Lancashire sub-region had relatively low numbers of households living in temporary accommodation and were placed in the lowest 37% of the rankings. Blackpool, placed in 154th position, was the only Lancashire authority to fall in the top half of the rankings (of the 326 local authorities in England) with the remaining authorities in the Lancashire sub-region falling in the lower half of the rankings. Blackpool, South Ribble and Preston have consistently recorded relatively greater figures in comparison to the other Lancashire authorities, and with 35, 28 and 19 households living in temporary accommodation in 2014/15, respectively, these three authorities had the highest numbers in the Lancashire sub-region. 

Hyndburn, Ribble Valley, Rossendale, West Lancashire and Wyre recorded fewer than five households living in temporary accommodation in 2014/15 and have generally had low numbers over the past ten years. These districts fall in the lowest 6% of the rankings. Six local authorities within England recorded no households living in temporary accommodation in 2014/15.

The three London Boroughs of Newham, Brent and Haringey, recorded the greatest numbers of households living in temporary accommodation in 2014/15, totaling 3,302, 3,161 and 2,997 households, respectively.

Table 3a: Households living in temporary accommodation, 2010/11 to 2014/2015

Area  

2010/11(1)

2011/12(1)

2012/13(1)

2013/14(1)

2014/15(1)(p)

Burnley

6

14

8

6

9

Chorley

12

22

11

8

12

Fylde

7

10

10

9

11

Hyndburn

-

-

-

0

-

Lancaster

-

15

18

8

6

Pendle

0

6

13

8

8

Preston

21

18

15

14

19

Ribble Valley

5

5

5

-

-

Rossendale

-

0

-

-

-

South Ribble

30

35

32

26

28

West Lancashire

-

-

-

-

-

Wyre

-

-

-

-

-

Lancashire 12-authority area

89

132

121

91

93

Blackburn with Darwen UA

-

6

-

6

5

Blackpool UA

23

22

24

21

35

Lancashire 14-authority sub-region

115

 160

148

118

133

England

48,240

   50,430

55,320

58,410

64,710

Notes: (1) Figures for the Lancashire County Council 12-authority area and the Lancashire 14-authority sub-region may not sum owing to suppression rules used at the district and unitary level. (p) Data for 2014/15 are provisional.

Source: Department of Communities and Local Government (Table 784).

Table 3b: Households living in temporary accommodation, 2005/06 to 2009/2010 

Area

2005/06(1)

2006/07(1)

2007/08(1)

2008/09(1)

 2009/10(1)

Burnley

18

25

21

18

14

Chorley

33

-

39

24

6

Fylde

26

18

18

14

-

Hyndburn

-

-

-

-

0

Lancaster

28

30

26

-

-

Pendle

-

6

-

7

0

Preston

84

74

76

51

21

Ribble Valley

5

5

8

-

-

Rossendale

-

7

-

0

-

South Ribble

47

49

31

21

21

West Lancashire

-

-

7

-

-

Wyre

20

20

10

-

-

Lancashire 12-authority area

272

239

241

150

78

Blackburn with Darwen UA

5

11

6

-

-

Blackpool UA

71

42

31

28

22

Lancashire 14-authority sub-   region

348

292

278

181

102

England

96,370

87,120

77,510

64,000

       51,310

Notes: (1) Figures for the Lancashire County Council 12-authority area and the Lancashire 14-authority sub-region may not sum owing to suppression rules used at the district and unitary level. (p) Data for 2014/15 are provisional.

Source: Department of Communities and Local Government (Table 784).

Rough Sleepers

The Department for Communities and Local Government homelessness statistics web page includes figures on rough sleeping in England. Rough sleeping counts and estimates are single night snapshots of the number of people sleeping rough in local authority areas. Local authorities decide whether to carry out a count or an estimate based upon their assessment of whether the local rough sleeping problem justifies counting. For autumn 2014, the 14 Lancashire authorities provided either street counts or estimates that together came to 37 rough sleepers. For England as a whole, the figure was 2,744.  These statistics are published in February of each year and refer to the number of rough sleepers in the previous autumn.

Recording of homelessness cases by local authorities

Local authorities record cases where homelessness is prevented or relieved on the P1E data return. Under sections 1 and 3 of the Homelessness Act 2002, local housing authorities must have a strategy for preventing homelessness in their district. The strategy must apply to everyone at risk of homelessness. 

All persons who fall within the authority’s scheme and for whom positive assistance was provided during the quarterly period (either by the authority or a partner organisation) should be recorded on the P1E form.

Complementary information on Lancashire Profile

The National Homeless Advisory Service is a partnership between Shelter and Citizens Advice, funded by the Department for Communities and Local Government.  The aim is to ensure that all people receive accurate and timely housing advice. 

The £20m Homeless Transition Fund aims to prevent and tackle rough sleeping in England.  The fund supports the work of the Foxton Centre in Preston.

 

Last updated June 2015 by Paul Ayre with data from 2014/2015 

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