Homelessness

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Homeless and in priority need, plus rough sleepers

2013/14

 

Services for the homeless
Anyone requiring information on services for homeless should visit the Homeless UK website that details the range of help available for the homeless, and those at risk of homelessness. Information can also be found on the Direct Gov and Shelter websites.

Introduction
This short article contains information on the number of households accepted as homeless and in priority need in Lancashire between April 2013 and March 2014. The figures have been downloaded from the Department of Communities and Local Government website. The site has a 'live tables on homelessness'  page (Table 784) that gives access to the homelessness figures that are published each year down to the local authority area level. Mention is also made of the households living in temporary accommodation results that are available from the same data source.

This article also highlights the rough sleepers figures that are available for Lancashire local authorities. 

The information is used in the development of housing needs indices, responses to parliamentary questions and for policy development on housing issues. Local authorities also use the data for either management purposes or to assist the continued development of housing strategies.

Households accepted as homeless and in priority need

For England as a whole, the local authority with the largest number of households accepted as homeless and in priority need in the year to March 2014 was Birmingham with 3,160, well in excess of Newham in second place with 1,320 and Hackney in third with 906.

Table 1 reveals that in the 14-authority Lancashire area in 2013/14, there were 307 households accepted as homeless and in priority need that equates to just 0.6% of the England total of 52,260. South Ribble recorded the largest number with 52, followed by 46 in Preston. Chorley was the only authority in the country that returned a zero figure, whilst Lancaster was one of 10 authorities across the country with no result.  Hyndburn, Ribble Valley, Rossendale and Wyre all recorded less than 10, and no Lancashire authorities were ranked in the top 200 for the number per 1,000 households.

The Department for Communities and Local Government website details some of the initiatives that are in place to reduce levels of homelessness.

Table 1 Households accepted as homeless and in priority need, April 2013 to March 2014

Area  
Households accepted as homeless
Number per 1,000 households
Rank of 326 authorities in England (by per 1,000 households)*
Burnley
38
1.03
235
Chorley
0
0.00
316
Fylde
13
0.36
294
Hyndburn
3
0.09
310
Lancaster
--
--
---
Pendle
18
0.47
279
Preston
46
0.79
216
Ribble Valley
7
0.28
305
Rossendale
9
0.31
302
South Ribble
52
1.11
201
West Lancashire
35
0.76
240
Wyre
9
0.19
303
Lancashire County Council (12-district area)
230
Blackburn with Darwen UA
40
0.69
230
Blackpool UA
37
0.58
237
Lancashire (14-authority area)
307
England
52,260
2.32

Source: Department of Communities and Local Government (Table 784)

*No percentage rates were available for 10 of the 326 local authorities in England. Chorley was the only authority to actually give a zero figure 

Households Living in Temporary Accommodation

Table 2 reveals a strong pattern of decline in the number of households classified as living in temporary accommodation between 2005/06 and 2010/11, but the last few years have seen a reversal in this trend. For 2013/14, the number for the whole of England increased to 58,590, noticeably higher than the low point of 48,240 recorded in 2010/11.

For the 14-authority Lancashire area, 91 households were classified as living in temporary accommodation in 2013/14, which was noticeably lower that the two previous years. Hyndburn recorded no households, and four other Lancashire authorities had fewer than five.  In contrast, South Ribble has consistently recorded quite a high figure in comparison with other Lancashire authorities, and with 26 households in temporary accommodation in 2013/14, it had the highest number in Lancashire.  

Table 2. Households living in temporary accommodation, 2005/06 to 2013/2014 

Area  
2005/06
2006/07
2007/08
2008/09
2009/10
2010/11
2011/12
2012/13
2013/14
Burnley
18
25
21
18
14
6
14
8
6
Chorley
33
39
24
6
12
22
11
8
Fylde
26
18
18
14
3
7
10
10
9
Hyndburn
4
2
1
2
0
2
2
2
0
Lancaster
28
30
26
4
3
1
15
18
8
Pendle
3
6
3
7
0
0
6
13
8
Preston
84
74
76
51
21
21
18
15
14
Ribble Valley
5
5
8
4
3
5
5
5
2
Rossendale
3
7
1
0
2
1
0
4
4
South Ribble
47
49
31
21
21
30
35
32
26
West Lancashire
1
3
7
4
4
3
4
2
3
Wyre
20
20
10
1
1
1
1
1
3
Lancashire County Council (12-district area)
272
239
241
150
78
89
132
121
91
Blackburn with Darwen UA
5
11
6
3
2
3
6
3
6
Blackpool UA
71
42
31
28
22
23
22
24
21
Lancashire (14-authority area)
348
292
278
181
102
115
 160
148
118
England
96,370
87,120
77,510
64,000
51,310
48,240
 50,430
55,320
58,590
Temporary accommodation under homelessness provisions: The duty owed to a household accepted by a local housing authority as eligible for assistance, unintentionally homeless and in priority need is to secure suitable accommodation.

Rough Sleepers
The Department for Communities and Local Government homelessness statistics web page includes figures on rough sleeping in England. Rough sleeping counts and estimates are single night snapshots of the number of people sleeping rough in local authority areas. Local authorities decide whether to carry out a count or an estimate based upon their assessment of whether the local rough sleeping problem justifies counting. For Autumn 2013, the 14 Lancashire authorities provided either street counts or estimates that together came to just 18 rough sleepers. For England as a whole, the figure was 2,414. 

Recording of homelessness cases by local authorities
Local authorities record cases where homelessness is prevented or relieved on the P1E data return. Under sections 1 and 3 of the Homelessness Act 2002, local housing authorities must have a strategy for preventing homelessness in their district. The strategy must apply to everyone at risk of homelessness. 

All persons who fall within the authority’s scheme and for whom positive assistance was provided during the quarterly period (either by the authority or a partner organisation) should be recorded on the P1E form. The following spreadsheet contains quarterly local authority results from the P1E returns for 12 district authorities in the Lancashire County Council area (excludes Blackburn with Darwen and Blackpool). The figures detail homeless acceptances by broad age-group of applicant and household type.

The figures split the results by broad age-groups and highlight the number of children in the accepted homeless and temporary accommodation categories.

Complementary information on Lancashire Profile    

 

The National Homeless Advisory Service is a partnership between Shelter and Citizens Advice, funded by the Department for Communities and Local Government. The aim is to ensure that all people receive accurate and timely housing advice.   

The £20m Homeless Transition Fund aims to prevent and tackle rough sleeping in England.  The fund supports the work of the Foxton Centre in Preston.

Last updated July 2014 by Bryan Moulding with data from 2013/2014